Reaching for rapture

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Infatuation.

It’s something most have us experienced at some time or another.

Perhaps it was an unyielding passion for collecting a childhood favourite toy (my toddler currently has a rather unhealthy obsession with collecting Paw Patrol pups in all shapes and sizes).

Or maybe it was an unending thirst for amassing the memorabilia of pop or movie star whose posters adorned your bedroom walls.

Even a simple crush on the boy or girl that sat next to you in English class made you think your heart might burst!

There’s no doubt about it…. Infatuation can be immensely enchanting.

And the whole concept of building a collection, or waiting for the next instalment of your obsessions TV show to come is, quite frankly, extremely thrilling.

Yes, humans always want more. We can’t wait for whatever comes next in relation to the things we are infatuated with.

Customers are naturally insatiable. We yearn for the things we don’t yet have and, apparently, can’t live without.

On the flip side, that just goes to prove that there is no such thing as a wholly and permanently satisfied consumer.

We always feel like the one thing we really need is out of our grasp. (Aside from Paw Patrol, my little one is continually determined to find the next ‘perfect’ rock for her collection!)

End-users are insatiable

Taking all this into account, trying to endlessly satisfy consumers can be quite a fruitless task.

Therefore, why not consider infatuating them?!

Yes, rapture is usually a short-lived attraction. But that sums up the nature of a customer pretty well.

People want an emotive end user experience, time after time.

So, you need to consider infatuating them, over and over again.

You want to be relevant to them.

Make them fixate on the novelty of a product or service.

Seduce them with consumer benefits.

Ensure they feel privileged.

Sure, the infatuation interval is fleeting.

And, after a while, they will start pushing for more.

So, it’s important not to let them linger in this entitlement period for too long.

Well, at least not unless you are willing to listen to their demands and suggestions.

Otherwise they will start to become critical and will direct their attention elsewhere.

Refresh… and repeat

So, it’s vital to continually refresh the customer experience to keep the infatuation flame burning.

Keep introducing new dimensions.

Airlines did this went they introduced individual screens to the seat backs on planes.

I know I was extremely excited to be able to choose my own film and not be stuck watching whatever crap you had to strain your neck to see on the ‘communal’ screen in the middle of the aisle.

But the entertainment systems soon lost their appeal and, after the first whispers of criticism, customer feedback management teams were dealing with consumer complaints.

Why can I only watch my movie at cruising altitude?

I saw this one when I flew last time! Why the hell isn’t there a greater selection?

And those earphones… what were the designers thinking?!

Yep, that initial excitement soon faded into the ether.

As with everything, the initial novelty wore off. People wanted better – and more – enhancements.

Evoke elation

So, how do you make use of the phenomenon that is the initial infatuation?

Firstly, you need to offer a customer experience that conjures genuine consumer elation.

Deliver product and service features that make the infatuation interval as lengthy as possible.

And make sure that the stream of fascination is continuous.

Once you sense that end users are drifting away and losing some of their infatuation, you need to launch enticing innovations that pull them back in.

You’re aiming for a perpetual cycle of infatuation with existing customers whilst drawing in new ones.

Obviously, to be able to do this effectively, you need to understand your consumers. It’s important to regularly collect and rigorously analyse customer feedback.

It’s also worthwhile monitoring social media to capture and interpret unsolicited customer impressions.

Here at The Monachie Project, we can also shed light on customer desires with our end user experience monitoring.

Don’t let the pull weaken.

You don’t want to just simply satisfy your customers.

You need to deliver a string of emotive end user experiences that keep them perpetually enthralled.

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